Long and Faraway Gone by Lou Berney

Berney’s psychological mystery reminds me of Kate Atkinson and Laura Lippman. Though not compelling enough to be a thriller, Long and Faraway Gone is not a typical mystery either since the only murder happened 25 years ago in a robbery of a movie theater. Now, Wyatt, our PI hero, is asked to return to Oklahoma City, the setting of that crime, to solve a current harassment case.

At the same time another mystery across town of a missing girl (also from 25 years ago) is being reexamined by the sister of the missing girl. The crippling and shifting memories of these two unsolved crimes drags the two unconnected cases closer and closer. At least in the traumatic memories of both protagonists.

lou-berney-long-faraway-goneThere is a quiet darkness to this story – I can’t really say I enjoyed reading this book, though it will be one of those stories that I remember long after I have forgotten many other stories. It is well written and the characters are well drawn and believable…. At least until the ending when suddenly, both characters (the PI and the sister) remember details of their lives 25 years before! And of course, these details lead to the resolution of the cases.

I learned a great deal about Oklahoma City. But unless you plan to visit there, I am not sure that I can recommend this book over others. I liked Wyatt, and I hope to see him again in other mysteries where there actually is a mystery. Long and Faraway Gone was nominated for both the Anthony and the Barry Awards — but I can only rate it a 3 out of 5.

The Cold Cold Ground by Adrian McKinty

Having read Gun Street Girl by McKinty last fall, I decided to go back and read the first in his Irish historical series on The Troubles. And I am certainly glad I did. I am a big fan of Irish Noir (Ken Bruen, Tana French, Stuart Neville, Declan Hughes, Alex Barclay, Declan Burke) but only tolerate the routine violence to enjoy the prose. Here with McKinty, I have finthe-cold-cold-ground-adrian-mckinty1ally found a great noir writer who gives the Irish experience without detailing all the gore.

It is 1981 in Northern Ireland, and Belfast is on the verge of outright civil war. Soldiers, riots, bombings. And in the midst of it all, a serial killer of gay men. Poor Sean Duffy, a young and Catholic detective in a Protestant Royal Ulster Constabulary, is trying to personally survive as he uncovers a smart plot of deceit and false clues.

The setting and the characters are written superbly. You know you have a winner when you like the protagonist and cheer him/her on – even when they do foolish things like drink to excess when the killer is headed his way or forget to check for bombs under his car! You will really enjoy this series. Start with this one if you haven’t read any before

My rating 5 of 5